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Really liking the Kobo Touch

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21 Dec 2012, 02:06 PM
Post: #1
I just wanted to say that I am really enjoying the Kobo Touch. As the owner of several other eReaders, it is really useful to be able to just swap between them and read books in any format, and for ePub my favourite is definitely my Kobo Touch. I particularly like the options for setting fonts and screen sharpness. The web browser is none too shabby either.

It's a shame that we have to have a world where everything is on a competing format or lock-in, and I am very fortunate to have access to different ones to compare. Of course for the more enterprising eReader owner, there are numerous ways to convert between formats including the ubiquitous Calibre.
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21 Dec 2012, 02:56 PM
Post: #2
i have to agree, i used to have the sony prs350 which was a fab first ereader but would randomly switch itself off or reboot whenever it felt like it and my lovely other half bought me a kobo touch for my birthday i love it Smile

Anyone know the way to readers anonymous...
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29 Dec 2012, 12:05 PM
Post: #3
I've had a Kobo Touch for about a year now and I've always been more than happy with it. I'm not so happy about the fact it's nearly half the cost of what it was when I bought it - but that's what you get from being an early adopter I guess. And I really wish ereaders came in 10" formats - I know there are tablets but surely the whole point of the e-ink is lost. I have to say I've never used the bells and whistles of wifi I literally just use it to READ ebooks. Am I missing out? What more should I do?

Cally Phillips

http://www.callyphillips.co.uk
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29 Dec 2012, 01:02 PM
Post: #4
(29 Dec 2012 12:05 PM)CallyPhillips Wrote:  And I really wish ereaders came in 10" formats

They do - the Kindle DX with 9.7" eInk screen is pretty old technology but is now available worldwide. I don't think any of the other big names in eReaders have gone for that niche market yet. Although the DX has a specialist market, I'd argue that the success of 7" Androids, and the uptake of the 8" iPad show that around 7" is fairly optimal.
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29 Dec 2012, 05:31 PM
Post: #5
Yeah, I expect it suits most folk from the ease of portability approach, but I have to say that I'd be happier reading ebooks if the screen was the same size as a standard page of paperback! I will never be totally happy with reading such small chunks of text - worse if you put the font size up. What I REALLY love about ereaders is what you can FIND TO READ on them. Loads of great stuff that mainstream publishers just wouldn't look at but which can be excellent and cheap. I know small is the way to go but if only they'd replicated paperback dimensions I'd be really happy. And though a tablet will do that, I'm not sure I want to migrate away from e-ink back to effectively just reading on a laptop screen! Nothing's perfect ever eh?

Cally Phillips

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29 Dec 2012, 08:15 PM
Post: #6
Way back in 1987 there was a short-lived Sci-Fi series on BBC2 called "Star Cops". The main character, Nathan Spring, had a prototype portable computer called "Box" that had no true display of its own - it slaved any nearby screen of an appropriate size as needed. That was set in 2027 but current eReader technology is almost there already.

Take a document in Kindle or ePub format and you can display it on mobile phone, a 6" eInk display, a 7" or 10" colour tablet, or a much larger PC screen. Even better you can effortlessly switch between those screens - use the PC at your desk, phone at lunchtime, pick up where you left off using eInk on the train home and then finish the book on a colour tablet curled up in bed. That flexibility is the aspect of eBooks that really sells it for me.

Perhaps because I started reading eBooks on a 160 x 160 pixel display, I've never had a problem with small screens. Given a suitably absorbing book I find that the whatever action is needed to page quickly disappears into the background and becomes invisible. Diagrams in text books are the only real limitation I've found with small screens - even then I've read five or six text books this year on a 5" phone using the Kindle app and a modicum of zooming and panning.

I absolutely agree about the way eReaders are increasing the range of books available - though I'd like to see more older books brought back into print. There are some publishers, such as Macmillan Bello, who are bringing backlisted books back to life, but in some cases the quality of the digitisation has been rather poor.
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30 Dec 2012, 02:19 PM
Post: #7
(29 Dec 2012 08:15 PM)frogplate Wrote:  Way back in 1987 there was a short-lived Sci-Fi series on BBC2 called "Star Cops". The main character, Nathan Spring, had a prototype portable computer called "Box" that had no true display of its own - it slaved any nearby screen of an appropriate size as needed. That was set in 2027 but current eReader technology is almost there already.

Take a document in Kindle or ePub format and you can display it on mobile phone, a 6" eInk display, a 7" or 10" colour tablet, or a much larger PC screen. Even better you can effortlessly switch between those screens - use the PC at your desk, phone at lunchtime, pick up where you left off using eInk on the train home and then finish the book on a colour tablet curled up in bed. That flexibility is the aspect of eBooks that really sells it for me.

Perhaps because I started reading eBooks on a 160 x 160 pixel display, I've never had a problem with small screens. Given a suitably absorbing book I find that the whatever action is needed to page quickly disappears into the background and becomes invisible. Diagrams in text books are the only real limitation I've found with small screens - even then I've read five or six text books this year on a 5" phone using the Kindle app and a modicum of zooming and panning.

I absolutely agree about the way eReaders are increasing the range of books available - though I'd like to see more older books brought back into print. There are some publishers, such as Macmillan Bello, who are bringing backlisted books back to life, but in some cases the quality of the digitisation has been rather poor.

Interesting. In so many ways. I don't have much need of 'transportability' but I can see the value for folks who are 'out and about'. Since my biggest move is from upstairs office to downstairs couch it's not an issue for me. But of course the opening up of what's available, now that IS the power of ebooks. I've spent the last year (nearly finished) bringing my back catalogue of stageplays out in ebook format - not because there's loads of people who read stageplays on ebooks (but that might change) but because it's possible and stageplays are something that cost a fortune when printed so that they have traditionally only hit a very small readership. We all read plays at school though without difficulty (well, not much) and I see no reason why people can't enjoy a playscript on ereaders.

And for what it's worth, I'm engaged in a project bringing backlisted books back. It's more a labour of love than anything else though, but like you, I've found the quality of digitisation not just poor but WOEFUL in those I'm interested in - so I'm building a catalogue myself. It takes time and effort but I hope it'll be worth both. Won't be showing results to the world for another year though. That's how much time it's going to take!!

The future is certainly opening up with the technology - if only one can find a way not to just be a spit in the ocean alongside a million other spits.

Cally Phillips

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30 Dec 2012, 06:01 PM
Post: #8
(30 Dec 2012 02:19 PM)CallyPhillips Wrote:  I've found the quality of digitisation not just poor but WOEFUL in those I'm interested in - so I'm building a catalogue myself.

Indeed! My pet hate is publishers that take old copies of books, run them through an optical character recognition system, spell-check and then publish as an eBook without having bothered to even skim through it for howlers. The give away is incorrectly scanned words that happen to form valid words that make no sense in the context - for example "clam" ending up as "dam". Even a cursory glance by a proof-reader would make an enormous difference.
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